Types of Personal Injury

Personal injury is a legal term for an injury to the body, mind or emotions. A personal injury case is usually filed by the victim, or the family of the injured in case of wrongful death, who has suffered harm to his or her body or mind. This legal action is filed against the person or party, whose negligence, gross negligence, reckless conduct, or intentional misconduct, has caused the harm. Though jurisdictions differ as to what an injured victim may be compensated for, damages usually include medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and diminished quality of life.

Causes of personal injury include road traffic accidents, work accidents, slip and fall accidents, assault, product defect (product liability), premises liability, medical and dental accidents, industrial or construction site accidents, and animal attack, including dog bites.

Of these, the most common are motor vehicle accidents, which claim more than 30,000 every year and which cause injuries to more than two million individuals. According to the law firm Karlin, Fleisher & Falkenberg, LLC, the consequences of a serious car accident can quickly become overwhelming. On top of all the work that will be necessary for you to recover from the trauma of the accident, you will probably be saddled with a significant amount of debt once everything is said and done.

One surprising cause of personal injury, though, is dog bites. As explained by the law firm Ravid & Associates, P.C., dogs are one of the most popular pets in the United States, with tens of millions of households owning at least one dog. Most dog owners are highly responsible and ensure that their pet is never allowed to put others in harm’s way. Unfortunately, in some circumstances, reckless or careless dog owners fail to properly train or restrain their pets, resulting in serious injuries caused by dog bites and attacks.

While some dog attacks may cause only minor injuries, it is not uncommon for dog bites and other aggressive actions to result in serious injuries, particularly in cases involving attacks on children. In the worst instances, dog attacks may even result in death.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 4.5 million dog bites occur each year in the United States. Almost 1 out of 5 bites becomes infected. While it is true that dogs can be our closest companions – this is why they often live in our homes and, based on studies, it has been proven that they increase our exercise levels, decrease stress, and are frequent playmates for children, it is also true that, sometimes, they bite. In addition to causing pain, injury, or nerve damage, dog bites can become infected, placing the bite victim at risk for illness or even death.